Mechanic’s Liens

Common Mechanic’s Liens Questions Answered Part 2

Our Florida construction attorneys have seen the effects of liens on properties even when an owner has acted responsibly and paid their contractors. This is why we believe providing answers to common lien questions will be an asset to you as you move forward in your construction business. Read Part 1 for the first part of the article.

How Can I Avoid a Lien on My Property?

If owners want to avoid a lien on their property, they must make every effort to pay their contractors and contractors should also make every effort to pay their subcontractors and suppliers so that everyone can experience a win-win situation. Owners should strive to ensure contractors are paying those they hire so that the owner will not end up paying twice for the same work.

When and Where Do I Record a Lien?

Liens must be recorded with your local clerk of the court or the county recorder’s office, depending on your county, within 90 days of when you last provided a service, labor, or materials on a construction project.

How Long is the Lien Effective?

Liens expire 1 year from the date you record the lien. If the owner serves a Notice of Contest, this period is reduced to 60 days after filing the lien. If the owner files a lawsuit in response to the mechanic’s lien, the lien expires 20 days after recording the lien.

Can I File a Lien on a Public Project?

Liens can be filed on private projects only. To recover payment for public projects, a bond claim must be filed instead.

To request a consultation with one of our experienced Florida construction lawyers, please call us today at 813.579.3278 or submit our contact request form.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.

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