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Another Year, Another Record Number of Safety Inspections

As 2019 draws to a close, the time has come for construction professionals across the nation to reflect on their successes and failures. From blown budgets to missed deadlines, acknowledging failure and making an effort to learn from it is integral to the success of your construction business, and you’ll be hard-pressed to find a more enlightening lesson than those taken from experiences dealing with worker injuries and fatalities on the project site. 

When it comes to workers’ health and safety, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has traditionally escalated its efforts on a year-to-year basis. After all, 2019 was a record year for OSHA inspections, and oversight will continue to expand in 2020, which means that contractors must keep constant vigil over their project sites to avoid costly citations.

Related: 9 OSHA Safety and Health Regulations for the Construction Industry

In this article, the OSHA defense attorneys at Cotney Construction Law will discuss OSHA’s activities in 2019 as well as their plans to expand inspections again in 2020. If OSHA has issued your construction firm a citation, consult our OSHA defense attorneys to learn about your options for protecting your project and your profits.

OSHA Inspections Are Trending Upwards (Again)

To the detriment of contractors, OSHA inspections will continue to increase in frequency in 2020. If you want to be prepared, investing in a subscription plan now could help you save big in the long-term by giving you unrestricted access to an experienced team of OSHA defense lawyers

Related: The Arrival of an Unannounced OSHA Inspector

As we mentioned above, 2019 was a record year for OSHA inspections (and compliance assistance requests), and 2020 is slated to be more of the same. And while OSHA may take great pride in their efforts to establish and enforce rules and regulations that help improve worker safety, it’s impossible to ignore the fact that OSHA has established a restrictive regulatory framework that has the potential to cost contractors their reputation and livelihood.

Breaking Down the Inspection Numbers

In 2019, OSHA’s enforcement activities were largely focused on trenching, falls, chemical exposure, silica, and other hazards. There were 33,401 inspections in total for the 2019 fiscal year. Additionally, there were 137,885 workplace hazards identified through OSHA’s On-Site Consultation Program. Although this program is free, it can lead to an inspection, so many employers are skeptical about relying on them. One popular alternative are third-party site audits, which can be performed by our OSHA defense lawyers.

If you would like to speak with one of our OSHA defense lawyers, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.