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Metal Roofs Vs. Asphalt Shingles Part 2

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Determining the right kind of roof for your construction project seems like a simple task, but when you start to weigh the pros and cons of various roofing materials like metal and asphalt, that simple decision can quickly turn into a hotly contested, internal debate. In part one, the Fort Lauderdale construction attorneys at Cotney Construction Law discussed the cost, lifespan, and aesthetic of metal roofs and asphalt shingles. In part two, we will continue to explore aspects of these two roofing materials including resiliency and energy efficiency.

Resiliency

Resiliency is defined as “the capacity to recover quickly from difficulties; toughness.” A resilient roof can handle being walloped by a severe storm and doesn’t crumble under the pressure of melting ice or a minor earthquake. What causes asphalt to be so resilient? SBS-modified or “rubberized” shingles improve impact resistance and ensure that shingles stay put when conditions get worse. New advances have resulted in asphalt shingles that can protect homes from nearly everything, even algae.

Metal roofs can withstand winds exceeding 140 miles per hour, which is the equivalent of an F2 tornado. However, the most impressive aspect of metal roofs is their ability to resist fires. With wildfires scorching various parts of the country each year, builders are turning to metal roofs to give new and existing homes a fighting chance against the torrid dry season. Metal roofing is typically designated with a Class A fire rating, which means it is “nearly impenetrable” to moisture while resisting impacts from hail and debris. Monroe County in Florida even considered making metal the standard moving forward for new and replacement roofs. With improved coatings that help resist corrosion, metal roofing is safer than ever before.

Energy Efficiency

One major advancement in asphalt shingles is improvements to the Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) which includes metrics for reflectance and thermal emittance. Adding asphalt granules with light-reflecting pigments can increase the solar reflective value of a roof ten times over. This type of roof, deemed “Cool Roofing” is designed specifically to reflect solar energy, not absorb it. This eases the burden on the home’s cooling systems and reduces wear and tear on the roof. Comparatively, the highly reflective surface of metal roofing typically provides a 30 percent cost saving on cooling when compared to other roofing types.

If you would like to speak with a Fort Lauderdale construction attorney, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.