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Understanding Laws Related to Workplace Discrimination Part 6

Throughout this six-part series, the Lakeland construction attorneys at Cotney Construction Law have discussed many topics related to workplace discrimination. In this final part, our attorneys will offer construction employers some final pieces of advice on ways they can ensure that their workplace remains discrimination-free. To catch up on this series, please read parts one, two, three, four, and five

Cultivating a Workplace Free of Discrimination

With an extremely diverse workforce in construction, it’s important that construction employers consider the following ways to eliminate or at least greatly reduce acts of discrimination or harassment at their workplace: 

  • Be Respectful: it’s important that employees respect their differences (race, culture, age, etc.) at the jobsite. Employers should always promote that their employees be professional in conduct and in the way they speak to each other. 
  • Be Vigilant: it’s important that employers communicate to their workforce that they will not condone any form of unprofessionalism at the workplace, including discrimination or harassment. As it states on the EEOC’s website, “When in doubt, leave it outside the workplace.” 

Developing Company Policies 

Although it’s important to effectively communicate the above tips with your workforce, it’s equally important to have a comprehensive employee manual that features workplace policies that clearly define that discrimination and harassment will not be tolerated in the workplace. Fortunately, when you partner with a Lakeland construction attorney, they can draft an anti-harassment policy to feature in your employee manual. This policy will state what conduct is prohibited, the penalty for violating the policy, and the complaint procedure for employees that want to report misconduct.    

Open Door and Confidentiality

It’s critical that construction firms establish policies that motivate employees to come forward and disclose any incidents of inappropriate, harassing, discriminatory, or abusive behavior. Promoting openness and transparency with an open door policy encourages your workforce to be proactive and eliminate any perceived barriers between them and their supervisor or employer. It’s also important to ensure that all complaints and investigations are treated confidentially to the best of the employer’s ability. The identity of the compainant should only be disclosed during an investigation on a need-to-know basis. This will help ensure that the complainant is not retaliated against. 

As your construction business grows, you need to consider ways to integrate policies to help your business expand while also protecting your most important assets and mitigating any workplace issues before they become a serious dispute. When you partner with a Lakeland construction lawyer from Cotney Construction Law, we will look proactively at all aspects of your construction business and ensure the best interests of your construction firm remain protected.     

If you would like to speak with one of our Lakeland construction attorneys, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.