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Worker Injured? Here’s What You Need to Know Part 1

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If an employee is injured on the job, employers want to do right by them and make certain that their recovery process is covered through workers’ compensation. With that being said, when a worker is injured away from the job, this injury should not be covered by the employer. In this two-part series, a workers’ compensation defense attorney in Florida will discuss the grey area of injuries at the workplace and circumstances in which the employer should not be footing the bill.

Workers’ Compensation Coverage

An employer is liable to pay workers’ compensation for an injury if the employee is injured on the job performing work for the employer or engaging in a required task to benefit the business. Typically, when an injury transpires at the workplace, the employer is required to cover the employee’s medical bills, provide lost wages, pay for the employee’s rehabilitation requirements, and provide additional payment if the employee suffers a long-term injury. Although the majority of workers’ compensation claims are legitimate, in some cases, the employer is not liable and should not cover the injury.

The Timing of the Injury

If an employee is injured at the workplace, but they are “off the clock” this usually results in the employer covering their workers’ compensation. Although the circumstances of the injury are extremely important, typically, an employee that is injured either while entering or exiting the property qualifies for coverage. Of course, every workplace is different and employers should always consult with a Florida workers’ compensation defense lawyer if an injury transpires at their workplace.

Injured On or Off Property

Some workers are injured away from the workplace, but file a workers’ compensation claim hoping that their employer will cover their injury. Most injuries that transpire at the workplace are covered; however, there are some situations in which an employer is also liable if an employee is injured away from the work property.

For example, if an employee is required to travel for work to meet clients, the employer is liable to pay workers’ compensation if the employee is injured on their way to visit a client. Similarly, any type of training exercise or job tasks being performed away from the workplace should be covered. If you are unsure if your employee qualifies for workers’ compensation, a workers’ compensation defense attorney in Florida can assist you.

For more information on workers’ compensation, please read the second part of this article.

If you would like to speak with a Florida workers’ compensation defense lawyer, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.